Can Mac’s Get Viruses?

You may have heard that Macs are safer than Windows PC’s when it comes to cyber security and that is partly true. But it doesn’t mean they’re completely safe. Can Macs get Viruses? The likelihood of catching a virus whilst using a Mac computer is increasing. There are now more threats to Mac users than ever before. Here’s everything you need to know.

Q: Can Mac’s get viruses? A: Yes.

For a long time, it was widely believed that Mac’s were safe from viruses. This belief was supported by the creators, Apple. For years Apple used ‘Macs don’t get viruses’ in their marketing and on their website. It wasn’t an unsubstantiated claim.

They have historically had a smaller share of the market, making them less of a target. The integration between their software and hardware has always had the benefit of being harder to penetrate. And since the arrival of macOS X, they have had built in security measures, particularly for preventing malware getting on to the computer.

This has made it pretty hard to install something malicious onto a Mac computer. But they don’t make the ‘we don’t get viruses’ claim anymore. Because unfortunately it’s no longer true Mac’s can get viruses!

Can Macs get Viruses

Think you’re safe because you have a Mac? Think again: more Mac malware was detected in 2019 than viruses for Windows.

The real danger

Arguably the real danger facing Mac users is that they are unprepared. The assumption that you are safe simply because you are using a Mac actually leaves you more vulnerable to an increasing number of threats.

As useful as the in-built security features are, they only do so much. There are ways for seasoned hackers to bypass them and they don’t block all potential threats. As Macs have become more popular and the number of users has grown, so have the number of threats they face.

The safest option is to assume that you could be vulnerable.

What threats might you face when your Mac gets a virus?

The threats, like with any computer user, range from simply annoying to potentially devastating. Sometimes, something which seems as if it’s just annoying could actually be much worse. Here’s a few examples of what you could face.

ADWARE
Adware could be any unwanted program or pop up that displays unwanted ads. Often these can lead to malicious websites that could then deliver spyware – a program which tracks activity online and steals information, used for fraud or theft. Even a benign pop-up can be annoying and intrusive and hamper the day-to-day use of your computer.

TROJAN HORSES
Trojan horses hide a malicious software within an otherwise nonsuspicious link or download. Sometimes the malware inside the trojan horse will start operating without your knowledge, stealing personal data in the background. They’ve been a threat to Macs for a while. There was a particularly bad one a few years ago called ‘MacDownloader’ which hid in a fake Adobe Flash update.

MACRO VIRUSES
These are sort of like a Trojan Horse and begin to work when the user clicks on an infected file, often a Word document. It then runs a code that can release new files, corrupt data, take screenshots and deliver malware.

What’s on the horizon?

The threats above are all based on previously recorded events and new threats are most likely to fit into those common categories. But the threats are ever-present. Cyber criminals are always finding ways of bypassing basic levels of security and will exploit vulnerabilities in your system.

Techrader.com talked about a recent threat which involves a dangerous new malware.

It’s thought to be distributed by a known Vietnamese hacking group called OceanLotus (yes, we know, it sounds like something from a James Bond movie, but it is real!)

The malware allows them to spy on machines and steal confidential info and sensitive business documents from macOS users. As this is a known threat, the latest security patches should help to protect against it.

Signs that your Mac has a virus

You won’t always know if something is wrong, if you don’t have a real-time scanner installed. Some malware is designed to run quietly in the background. However, there are a number of ways that might indicate that something is wrong.

LOTS OF ADS AND POP UPS
This may be obvious but if you’ve got unwanted ads popping up and you don’t usually (and really any irregular pop ups are out of the ordinary on a Mac) then it suggests something has arrived on your computer.

RUNNING SLOW
Your computer being slow may just be the result of lots of programs using up memory on your computer, but it could be an indication that you have a virus. If the spinning rainbow ‘wheel of death’ is constantly appearing, then you may have an issue.

BROWSER ISSUES
Viruses come from the internet and are mostly designed to disrupt your online activity. If your browser is running slow, acting abnormally or crashing regularly then questions need to be asked.

What you should do?

As we mentioned above, really the first step is acknowledging that there is a threat in the first place. Yes, Macs may still be safer, but we always think we’ll be fine until something happens. If you’re a Mac user or your business uses Macs regularly then it’s better to be safe than sorry.

Contact the LIS Help Desk to make sure you have a good antivirus and cybersecurity system installed on your computer, as well as the standard tools you get in macOS. If you need support or help in this area, you know where we are.

LIS – SECURING YOUR DIGITAL WORLD

#apple #mac #malware

 

Apple set to launch glasses?

Apple set to launch glasses? Google Glass didn’t work out so well… how will the launch of Apple Glasses do?

It’s been an open secret for years that Apple is developing augmented reality (AR) glasses, particularly since the announcement of ARKit at WWDC. No wonder: with Google and Microsoft actively developing devices, it seems like a party Apple can’t afford to miss.

But what exactly does Apple have in its sights, and when are we going to see the new glasses?

A couple of patents granted in January 2020 gave some insight into Apple’s plans for a headset. A trusted source in May 2020 suggests, an announcement about price, specs by the end of the year. The source of that leak has also claimed that Apple is working on a separate, round-framed Steve Jobs Heritage Edition of the product, and we’re not sure whether to take him seriously.

In this feature, we look at all the latest Apple AR glasses rumours, patents and possible release date details, including iOS 13 support for AR glasses.

Apple set to launch glasses?

Apple Glass could redefine wearable computing. Here’s everything we know so far.

What is augmented reality?

First, a quick refresher on terms, as many get AR and VR confused. VR headsets are mounted on the head in a similar way to ski goggles, and completely block your view of the outside world. They track your head movement, and the 3D image displayed inside the headset moves accordingly. This makes it appear as if you’re wholly inside a 3D ‘virtual’ world.

AR glasses are see-through. An image is displayed in front of your eyes to see the world around you. AR hit the headlines in recent years, first thanks to Google Glass (which displays 2D images) and more recently with a headset developed by Microsoft called HoloLens that embeds 3D images in the world around you.

For more information about this exciting new product take a look at the article written by Daniel Piper for Creative Bloq.

If you would like to discuss you IT requirements or talk about the latest technology contact the LIS Help desk. We are a friendly bunch and will always do our best to help you.

#AppleGlass #GoogleGlass #WearableTech