Wi-Fi connection

Does your Wi-Fi connection keep dropping whilst working from home?

There often seems to be no reason behind Wi-Fi connections that randomly drop off or weaken. However, there are actually several common scenarios where an otherwise strong Wi-Fi connection can become unreachable. When that happens, there are a few things you can try to get your Wi-Fi back up and running again in no time.

Harriet Meyer a contributor for forbes.com takes a look at some solutions to dropped or lost Wi-Fi connections.

Insufficient Wi-Fi network range and power

Your wireless access point is going to reach only so far. When you’re accessing the internet on the outer edges of the range limit, you’ll notice the Wi-Fi connection start and stop, probably over and over. Of course, as you move even further away from the router or modem delivering the Wi-Fi, your connection will stop permanently.

You might be suffering from weak Wi-Fi access if your router is buried in a closet. It may be stuck in the corner of your basement, three rooms away, or is simply old or nearly broken. The solution might be as simple as moving closer to the router or moving the router closer to you. As you lessen the distance between the router and your device, you strengthen the odds of a good connection.

If you’re on a wireless device like a phone or tablet, it’s easy to move where the Wi-Fi strength is the strongest. On the other hand, relocating your computer or other gear isn’t always a practical solution.

Another option for improving Wi-Fi strength is to consider an antenna upgrade on your access point or on your computer, if possible. Similarly, mesh networks and range extenders are other common solutions to Wi-Fi range problems — but you don’t need both.

Wi-Fi connection

When a wireless device is experiencing an intermittent connection, it can be quite frustrating.
You want to fix it as quickly as possible so you can continue to work.

Wi-Fi connection radio interference

Radio signals from various consumer electronic products around your house can interfere with Wi-Fi network signals. For example, cordless phones, Bluetooth devices. As well as garage door openers and microwaves can each take down a Wi-Fi network connection when they’re powered on.

So, if you notice that your phone stops getting Wi-Fi when you’re right next to the microwave, chances are this is your problem. It’s best to look into what that new device is and how it works since the way it transmits wireless signals might be what’s interfering with other devices in the house.

Reposition your network equipment to improve your Wi-Fi coverage. Another solution, which might be easier, is to turn off those other devices that could be interfering with Wi-Fi. If you’re in the kitchen when Wi-Fi drops, move away from the microwave or avoid using it if you need to also use your phone, laptop, or other device.

The network is overloaded

Your hardware and home might be set up perfectly to accommodate Wi-Fi signals and avoid interference. However, if there are too many devices using the network, the available bandwidth for each device is limited.

When each device lacks enough bandwidth, videos stop playing, websites won’t open, and the device might even eventually disconnect and reconnect from the network, over and over, as it tries to hold on to enough bandwidth to keep using Wi-Fi.

You can test your internet speed to see if you’re getting the speeds you were promised. If the test shows a significantly slower speed than you pay your ISP for, there’s either a problem with your modem or router or you’re using too many devices on your network at once.

Take some of the devices off of the network. If your TV is streaming movies, turn it off. Someone gaming on your network? Ask them to take a break. Multiple people browsing Facebook on their phones? Ask them to disable their Wi-Fi connection to free up some of that bandwidth.

Cloud storage updates could affect your Wi-Fi connection

If someone’s downloading files onto a computer, see if they can use a program that supports bandwidth control. Less bandwidth will be used for that device and more will be available for your Wi-Fi device. In particular, Microsoft OneDrive tends to use all available upload bandwidth when it syncs large files. Temporarily pausing OneDrive could free up immediate bandwidth for other people.

If your network is still slower than you think it should be and Wi-Fi isn’t stable, restart your router. Sometimes, the router’s memory becomes full and needs flushing in order to work properly.

Keeping you connected

There is nothing more infuriating than trying to fix your own Internet and IT problems. Especially I you are not tech savvy. All you want to do is have the problem fixed so you can continue to do your work. Contact the LIS Help Desk to speak to one of our support technicians. We will remote into your PC and will be able to diagnose the problem.

Our clients benefit from our monthly IT support and security packages. We can also help you with your telecoms providing you with super-fast broadband, phone lines and mobile services. Think of us as you IT partners.

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